September 2, 2014

Center for Appalachian Studies

posted by on April 4th, 2013

The Center for Appalachian Studies, a department of the College of Arts and Sciences at Appalachian State University, was established in 1978 to coordinate and promote curriculum offerings, public programs, and research activities in the Appalachian region. Built on the work of generations of Appalachian scholars, including folklorists Amos Abrams and Cratis Williams, the Center works to illuminate and sustain the region’s rich history, cultures, communities, and ecology.

The Center offers the nation’s only Master of Arts degree in Appalachian Studies, and it coordinates coursework that leads to an undergraduate minor and a major concentration (through Interdisciplinary Studies) in Appalachian Studies. The Center encourages research and collaborative projects with local scholars, community groups, and other organizations concerned with the region’s past, present, and future. Collaborations have focused on projects such as coordination of the Appalachian Land Ownership Study, preservation microfilming of regional newspaper back issues and historical documents, supervision of multiple oral history projects production of a syndicated radio program organization of a regional cultural festival, development of Matewan Development Center, research on ethnic Appalachia, and sustainable development initiatives.

The faculty are drawn from 14 academic departments across the campus, and together with the Appalachian Cultural Museum, the Appalachian Journal, and the W. L. Eury Appalachian Collection, comprise important resources for the study of Appalachia and other mountain regions. (Used with permission of The University of Tennessee Press from the forthcoming book, The Encyclopedia of Appalachia.)

The Center for Appalachian Studies, a department of the College of Arts and Sciences at Appalachian State University, was established in 1978 to coordinate and promote curriculum offerings, public programs, and research activities in the Appalachian region. Built on the work of generations of Appalachian scholars, including folklorists Amos Abrams and Cratis Williams, the Center works to illuminate and sustain the region’s rich history, cultures, communities, and ecology.

The Center offers the nation’s only Master of Arts degree in Appalachian Studies, and it coordinates coursework that leads to an undergraduate minor and a major concentration (through Interdisciplinary Studies) in Appalachian Studies. The Center encourages research and collaborative projects with local scholars, community groups, and other organizations concerned with the region’s past, present, and future. Collaborations have focused on projects such as coordination of the Appalachian Land Ownership Study, preservation microfilming of regional newspaper back issues and historical documents, supervision of multiple oral history projects production of a syndicated radio program organization of a regional cultural festival, development of Matewan Development Center, research on ethnic Appalachia, and sustainable development initiatives.

The faculty are drawn from 14 academic departments across the campus, and together with the Appalachian Cultural Museum, the Appalachian Journal, and the W. L. Eury Appalachian Collection, comprise important resources for the study of Appalachia and other mountain regions. (Used with permission of The University of Tennessee Press from the forthcoming book, The Encyclopedia of Appalachia.)

The Center for Appalachian Studies, a department of the College of Arts and Sciences at Appalachian State University, was established in 1978 to coordinate and promote curriculum offerings, public programs, and research activities in the Appalachian region. Built on the work of generations of Appalachian scholars, including folklorists Amos Abrams and Cratis Williams, the Center works to illuminate and sustain the region’s rich history, cultures, communities, and ecology.

The Center offers the nation’s only Master of Arts degree in Appalachian Studies, and it coordinates coursework that leads to an undergraduate minor and a major concentration (through Interdisciplinary Studies) in Appalachian Studies. The Center encourages research and collaborative projects with local scholars, community groups, and other organizations concerned with the region’s past, present, and future. Collaborations have focused on projects such as coordination of the Appalachian Land Ownership Study, preservation microfilming of regional newspaper back issues and historical documents, supervision of multiple oral history projects production of a syndicated radio program organization of a regional cultural festival, development of Matewan Development Center, research on ethnic Appalachia, and sustainable development initiatives.

The faculty are drawn from 14 academic departments across the campus, and together with the Appalachian Cultural Museum, the Appalachian Journal, and the W. L. Eury Appalachian Collection, comprise important resources for the study of Appalachia and other mountain regions. (Used with permission of The University of Tennessee Press from the forthcoming book, The Encyclopedia of Appalachia.)

appstudies.appstate.edu

Speak Your Mind

*