October 10, 2015

About Sarah Bryan

Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, native Sarah Luisa Bryan grew up in the Carolinas and Virginia, in a family of Carolinian and Cuban heritage. She and her husband Peter Honig live in Durham, North Carolina. Sarah and Peter are both old-time fiddlers and 78 rpm record collectors.

Her mother, Cristina Freeman Bryan, is an author, publisher, and Civil War historian in Calvert County, Maryland; her father, James “Poddy” Bryan, was a literary critic, professor, and designer of miniature golf courses, from Myrtle Beach. Her brother, Will Bryan, is a filmmaker in Richmond, Virginia.

In addition to music, folklife, and old photographs, Sarah is interested in animal welfare, Tar Heel basketball, Mets baseball, and The Andy Griffith Show. Read more at sarah-bryan.com.

Tyris Jones, Storytelling as a Craft

Storyteller Tyris Jones

by Sarah Bryan By returning to his roots, Tyris Jones discovered a new path in life. The Laurinburg native lived away from his hometown for years, but when he came back to live in Scotland County, he was inspired to combine his professional background and his family traditions into a new career as a storyteller. Jones has always had a love for stories and performance. He remembers absorbing his older relatives’ … [Read more...]

Collards a lo Cubano

My (NC) family's dining room table in Ellerbe.

by Sarah Bryan Verlie Helsabeck Freeman was a vivid woman. She had a cat named Mr. Cat, a set of dentures that she took out of her mouth and clacked at frightened great-grandchildren, and—as she warned overly curious visitors who might snoop around the house—a booger in her basement. (To readers who aren’t from North Carolina, let me hasten to explain that a booger is like a goblin, a small, scary creature … [Read more...]

Coke Is It: A Love Story


by Sarah Bryan It’s a moment that a lot of Southerners have had: when folks from somewhere else single out a characteristic of our speech or behavior that is evidently outlandish to the rest of the world, but that, until that moment, we hadn’t realized was at all weird. “You carried your grandmother to the store? Like, in your arms? On your back?” “What do you mean the collards aren’t done? They’ve been boiling for … [Read more...]